What happens when evil meets the human heart

I just finished watching the HBO series, The Pacific.  It is not for the weak at heart.  It is brutal, barbaric, and shocking.  But that’s what the Pacific theater was really like in WWII.  The last episode shows the young man in the trailer struggling to re-enter civilian life.  He collapses in his father’s arms weeping after picking up a gun for the first time to go dove hunting.  The association with the war was too much.  I found myself tearing up as I realized the terrible cost these men paid, a cost that many of them struggled with the rest of their lives.  For the war not only stole their bodies.  It stole their hearts as well. Those soldiers simply shut down their hearts to survive the barrage of blood, terror, and horror.  Watch the trailer to see for yourself.

And then it hit me…the connection to me, the connection to all of us.  I don’t have to live through a war.  For their story is our story.  What happened to them on a cataclysmic level happens to all of us.  The war with evil.  It descends on all of us, not through a physical war, but through abuse, shame, neglect, or loss.  We are caught off guard, unprepared for its brutality and sway.  And it screams out the same message it did for those soldiers.  “Shut down your heart.  Quit feeling.  If you don’t harden your heart, you will never survive the pain.”

That’s what happens when evil meets the human heart.  It is certainly my story when evil descended on me at age 13.  Through a series of events of neglect and loss, I simply did what seemed to be the only option.  I chose to shut down.  At least I won’t feel pain.  So many men and women I know have a similar story.  And once the hardening sets in, we become set-ups for idolatry, hedonism, alternate philosophies, and demonic assaults.

What is the way out?  It is the way we all avoid.  But it is the only way.  Right back through the pain.  It’s what those soldiers had to do to recover their hearts.  It’s what we all have to do.

And when you choose to go there, you will find a surprise.  The Father of all compassion waiting for you.

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About Coach D

I have been a teacher and a coach for many years. My real name is Bill Delvaux, but my students call me Coach D, hence the user name. This blog is about the journey into the unknown I am walking and the landmarks I am navigating along the way. The destination: becoming who I really am as a man. I invite you to join me by reading along every Monday and Thursday.
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4 Responses to What happens when evil meets the human heart

  1. Tim says:

    Love this line: “And once the hardening sets in, we become set-ups for idolatry, hedonism, alternate philosophies, and demonic assaults.” It exemplifies Proverbs 28:14 (“Blessed is the one who always trembles before God, but whoever hardens their heart falls into trouble”), doesn’t it?

    Nice job, Coach.

    Tim

    P.S. Heidi directed me here from my guest post over at My Offerings: http://myofferings.wordpress.com/2012/03/12/guest-post-seeing-me-for-who-i-really-am/. I’m also on a team of writer’s at Nick McDonald’s blog, linked through my name above. I’m glad Heidi suggested I come here to sample your stuff.

    • Coach D says:

      Tim,
      Sorry for the delay in replying. Your comments ended up in my spam! Thanks for reading my blog. It’s always fascinating to hear back from those who do read. And I am fascinated with the radical journey site. I too have thought and written much about masculinity. I hope to read more there.
      And let’s keep our hearts connected to the Father, the root of all true masculinity.

  2. Jessie Rucker says:

    I love this! How true it is that pain can cause us to shut down. I had too much to endure at 14. I remember putting the walls up. I also remember making the decision to trust the Lord with the pain but many years later. I now run to God instead of away from Him! He is always safe!!!!!

    • Coach D says:

      He is always safe, Jessie. I think shutting down is really everyone’s story at some level. Thanks for reading and replying. It’s fun to get comments!

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